This past February, President Barack Obama unveiled his new initiative, “My Brother’s Keeper,” during a televised White House event. During his announcement, the president invited foundation leaders, corporate executives and faith and other community leaders to participate in the program.

“It doesn’t take much, but it takes more than we’re doing now,” President Obama said. “And that’s what My Brother’s Keeper is all about -- helping more young people stay on track.”

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America recognizes and strongly supports the president’s call to action to create opportunities for young men of color who work hard to reach their full potential.

Through our local agencies across the country, we are uniquely positioned to help children who are facing adversity through one-to-one mentoring programs that are proven to succeed. Seventy percent of the children we serve are African American and Hispanic, with boys comprising more than 44 percent of our Littles.  There are currently 15,000 boys of color on agency waiting lists nationwide.

Richard A. Lewis, director, federal compliance and project management and Lowell W. Perry, Jr., chief diversity officer, senior vice president, corporate and community engagement, are liaising with White House and other government officials to position Big Brothers Big Sisters as a partner in helping children from all backgrounds, including boys of color, meet their potential.

Coinciding with President Obama’s unveiling of his new “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America has published a white paper titled, “Mentoring Makes a Difference in the Lives of Young Minority Men: A Review of the Empirical Evidence.”

The paper examines a growing body of empirical evidence that concludes that volunteer mentoring serves as a valuable prevention and intervention strategy that has proven effective at “making a difference” in the lives of at-risk, high-risk and underserved youth. In general, the extant body of research supports the claim that strong mentoring relationships reduce a variety of problem behaviors among vulnerable youth including young minority men. Specifically, mentoring serves as an effective mode of intervention for young people and favorable research findings are consistent across a range of populations, settings, modalities and outcomes.

Click here to view the full white paper.

“Big Brothers Big Sisters of America applauds President Obama for recognizing and addressing the unique challenges faced by America’s young men of color,” Lowell W. Perry, Jr., chief diversity officer, senior vice president, corporate and community engagement, said. “The majority of the children we serve are minorities, so the president’s initiative will complement our work to help children facing adversity through mentoring.”

This past February, President Barack Obama unveiled his new initiative, “My Brother’s Keeper,” during a televised White House event. During his announcement, the president invited foundation leaders, corporate executives and faith and other community leaders to participate in the program.

“It doesn’t take much, but it takes more than we’re doing now,” President Obama said. “And that’s what My Brother’s Keeper is all about -- helping more young people stay on track.”

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America recognizes and strongly supports the president’s call to action to create opportunities for young men of color who work hard to reach their full potential.

Through our local agencies across the country, we are uniquely positioned to help children who are facing adversity through one-to-one mentoring programs that are proven to succeed. Seventy percent of the children we serve are African American and Hispanic, with boys comprising more than 44 percent of our Littles.  There are currently 15,000 boys of color on agency waiting lists nationwide.

Richard A. Lewis, director, federal compliance and project management and Lowell W. Perry, Jr., chief diversity officer, senior vice president, corporate and community engagement, are liaising with White House and other government officials to position Big Brothers Big Sisters as a partner in helping children from all backgrounds, including boys of color, meet their potential.

Coinciding with President Obama’s unveiling of his new “My Brother’s Keeper” initiative, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America has published a white paper titled, “Mentoring Makes a Difference in the Lives of Young Minority Men: A Review of the Empirical Evidence.”

The paper examines a growing body of empirical evidence that concludes that volunteer mentoring serves as a valuable prevention and intervention strategy that has proven effective at “making a difference” in the lives of at-risk, high-risk and underserved youth. In general, the extant body of research supports the claim that strong mentoring relationships reduce a variety of problem behaviors among vulnerable youth including young minority men. Specifically, mentoring serves as an effective mode of intervention for young people and favorable research findings are consistent across a range of populations, settings, modalities and outcomes.

Click here to view the full white paper.

“Big Brothers Big Sisters of America applauds President Obama for recognizing and addressing the unique challenges faced by America’s young men of color,” Lowell W. Perry, Jr., chief diversity officer, senior vice president, corporate and community engagement, said. “The majority of the children we serve are minorities, so the president’s initiative will complement our work to help children facing adversity through mentoring.”
 


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